In this week’s Group Meeting, Dr. Tro and Health Coaches Amy Eiges & Brian Wiley discussed the importance of creating and utililizing social support. Having a community of people with like-minded goals is a great way to keep things on track and sustain success for the long term. 

Discussion:

  • Dr. Tro started the meeting by reviewing a study that showed the difference between people that had support and those that didn’t. The groups with support and follow-up adhered to their diet plan 25% more than those without. There was also an improvement in sustained weight loss. The bottom line: you can achieve greater results by recruiting family and community support than going it alone.
  • The second study Dr. Tro talked about focused on 2 groups that suffer from mental illness: one group got no support and the other had regular follow-ups. The follow-up group had much better results in weight loss and adherence than the group that did not.
  • A Group Coaching member described how she is the only one in her home eating low carb, often staring down piles of high carb, sugary items in her kitchen. The social support she had grown to depend on — friends at the gym — were not available to her during COVID. “It’s been a real challenge without the support and with the high carb food around all the time.” Brian suggested that she tell her family how these foods a huge temptation and problematic, and suggested asking her family to keep them out of sight to reduce the temptation.
  • Another member has a supportive home but feels judged when ordering food that’s differently when out. Amy explained how she felt like this in the beginning, and that going against the mainstream was hard at first, but then eventually when family and friends saw her success and that this “fad” was here to stay, they no longer judged (and she no longer cared if they did!). 
  • Dr. Tro, Amy and Brian all agreed that one of the best things to do is be up front and honest with family, friends, and co-workers if you think it will be helpful, but that keeping your explanations simple (“I don’t feel well when I eat x, y, z”) can be your best strategy. Addressing the issue up front helps with support if you’re feeling awkward when eating around them.

Article by Brian Wiley

Brian Wiley is a Certified Health Coach who struggled to lose weight for most of his life. He attempted most of the mainstream approaches, along with the standard advice to “eat, less move more.” This advice resulted in minimal short-term success, or no success at all. Brian then adopted a low-carb lifestyle in 2009, and succeeded in losing 100 pounds. He has maintained that weight loss ever since using a low-carb ketogenic IF lifestyle. "I see people every day, both in real life and on social media, struggling, going through the same cycles of unsuccessful dieting like I did. I want to serve as an example that this approach can be successful, is not a fad, and is a healthy long-term lifestyle solution." Brian is also an ACE certified personal trainer.